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, 99 (4), 1562-8

Cold Acclimation in Genetically Related (Sibling) Deciduous and Evergreen Peach (Prunus Persica [L.] Batsch): I. Seasonal Changes in Cold Hardiness and Polypeptides of Bark and Xylem Tissues

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Cold Acclimation in Genetically Related (Sibling) Deciduous and Evergreen Peach (Prunus Persica [L.] Batsch): I. Seasonal Changes in Cold Hardiness and Polypeptides of Bark and Xylem Tissues

R Arora et al. Plant Physiol.

Abstract

Seasonal patterns of proteins and of cold hardiness were characterized in bark and xylem tissues of genetically related (sibling) deciduous and evergreen peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch). In contrast with deciduous trees, which entered endodormancy and abscised leaves in the fall, evergreen trees retained their leaves and exhibited shoot elongation under favorable environmental conditions. A successive increase in the cold hardiness of bark and xylem was observed during the fall in both genotypes. This was followed by a subsequent decrease from midwinter to spring. Xylem tissue in both genotypes exhibited deep supercooling and a significant correlation (r = 0.99) between the midpoint of the low-temperature exotherm and the subzero temperature at which 50% injury occurred (assessed by electrolyte leakage) was noted. The maximum hardiness level attained in deciduous trees was more than twofold that of evergreens. Seasonal pattern of proteins from bark and xylem of the sibling genotypes was characterized by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Among other qualitative and quantitative changes, accumulation of a 19-kilodalton polypeptide in the bark of both genotypes was observed during fall followed by a decrease in spring. This polypeptide accumulated to higher levels in the deciduous peach compared with the evergreen. Additionally, a 16-kilodalton protein exhibited the same pattern in deciduous trees but not in the evergreen trees. Both the 19- and a 16-kilodalton bark proteins conform to the criteria of a bark storage protein. The relationship of seasonal changes in protein to cold hardiness and dormancy in these genetically related peach genotypes is discussed.

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