Patterned superhydrophobic surfaces: toward a synthetic mimic of the Namib Desert beetle

Nano Lett. 2006 Jun;6(6):1213-7. doi: 10.1021/nl060644q.

Abstract

The present study demonstrates a surface structure that mimics the water harvesting wing surface of the Namib Desert beetle. Hydrophilic patterns on superhydrophobic surfaces were created with water/2-propanol solutions of a polyelectrolyte to produce surfaces with extreme hydrophobic contrast. Selective deposition of multilayer films onto the hydrophilic patterns introduces different properties to the area including superhydrophilicity. Potential applications of such surfaces include water harvesting surfaces, controlled drug release coatings, open-air microchannel devices, and lab-on-chip devices.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • 2-Propanol / chemistry*
  • Acrylic Resins / chemistry*
  • Animals
  • Biomimetic Materials / chemistry*
  • Coleoptera / chemistry*
  • Crystallization / methods
  • Electrolytes / chemistry
  • Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions
  • Materials Testing
  • Nanostructures / chemistry*
  • Nanostructures / ultrastructure
  • Polyamines / chemistry*
  • Solutions
  • Surface Properties
  • Water / chemistry*
  • Wings, Animal / chemistry

Substances

  • Acrylic Resins
  • Electrolytes
  • Polyamines
  • Solutions
  • Water
  • polyallylamine
  • carbopol 940
  • 2-Propanol