Measuring wellness among resident physicians

Med Teach. 2006 Jun;28(4):370-4. doi: 10.1080/01421590600625320.

Abstract

Requirements to include professionalism in residency curricula have generated a substantial body of literature concerning the environments that fail to nurture professionalism. Local and national surveys provide evidence that a high prevalence of depersonalization and emotional exhaustion exists among residents and that clinical practice is impaired as a result of these factors. A group of 34 residents from ten residency programmes participated in the psychometric testing of a resident wellness assessment instrument that can be rapidly administered, scored, and interpreted. The Brief Resident Wellness Profile is composed of a Mood faces graphical rating item and a six-question subscale. The six-item subscale had good reliability (alpha = 0.83; r = 0.84), convergent validity (r = 0.63), discriminant validity (r = -0.37), and concurrent validity ( p = 0.007). The Mood faces item had good convergent validity (r = 0.66), discriminant validity (r = -0.71), and concurrent validity ( p = 0.008). The Brief Resident Wellness Profile appears to be a reliable and valid instrument that measures residents' sense of professional accomplishment and mood and can be rapidly administered, scored, and interpreted.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Validation Study

MeSH terms

  • Achievement*
  • Affect*
  • Humans
  • Internship and Residency*
  • Physicians / psychology*
  • Psychometrics / methods
  • Psychometrics / standards*
  • Stress, Physiological / psychology
  • Surveys and Questionnaires