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. 2006 Jun 22;2(2):181-3.
doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2005.0426.

Pregnancy Weight Gain: Marmoset and Tamarin Dads Show It Too

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Free PMC article

Pregnancy Weight Gain: Marmoset and Tamarin Dads Show It Too

Toni E Ziegler et al. Biol Lett. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Paternal behaviour is critical for the survival of offspring in many monogamous species. Common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) and cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus) fathers spend as much or more time caring for infants than mothers. Expectant males of both species showed significant increases in weight across the pregnancy whereas control males did not (five consecutive months for marmoset males and six months for cotton-top tamarin males). Expectant fathers might be preparing for the energetic cost of fatherhood by gaining weight during their mate's pregnancy.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
(a) Per cent change in male and (b) female body weight over the gestational range in common marmosets. Dark bars indicate expectant fathers and light bars indicate control males weighed for five consecutive months. A dark line is drawn across the 100% line. Letters indicate months significantly different from each other. For expectant marmoset fathers, month four was significantly higher than month one (Z=2.4, p=0.02) and month two (Z=2.2, p=0.03) but not months three and five. Month five was significantly higher than month one (Z=2.9, p=0.004), month two (Z=2.8, p=0.005), and month three (Z=2.05, p=0.04) but not month four. For mothers, month five was significantly higher than months 1–4 (Z=2.6–2.7, p=0.01–0.008) and month four was significantly higher than month 1 (Z=2.07, p=0.04).
Figure 2
Figure 2
(a) Per cent change in male and (b) female body weight over the gestational range in cotton-top tamarins. Dark bars indicate expectant fathers and light bars indicate control males weighed for six consecutive months. A dark line is drawn across the 100% line. Letters indicate months significantly different from each other. For expectant tamarin fathers, month six was significantly higher than month one (Z=2.6, p=0.01), month two (Z=2.0, p=0.05) and month three (Z=2.1, p=0.04) but not month four or five. For mothers, month six was significantly higher than months 1–5 (Z's=2.8–3.2, p's=0.001–0.005) and month five was significantly higher than months one, three, four (Z's=2.27–2.9, p's=0.02–0.005).

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