Breast cancer screening behaviors among African American women with a strong family history of breast cancer

Prev Med. 2006 Nov;43(5):385-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2006.06.003. Epub 2006 Jul 24.

Abstract

Background: Despite the importance of breast cancer screening to reduce morbidity and mortality, limited information is available on screening practices among African American women with a family history that is suggestive of hereditary breast cancer.

Objectives: To describe adherence to breast cancer screening recommendations among African American women with a family history that is suggestive of hereditary disease.

Methods: Participants were unaffected African American women (n=65) who had a family history of cancer that was suggestive of hereditary breast cancer. Breast cancer screening practices were evaluated by self-report. The study was conducted at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA. Women were recruited to participate in the study from February 2003-December 2005.

Results: Most women were adherent to recommendations for mammography (75%) and CBE (93%). A sizeable minority of women (41%) also performed excessive BSE. Being older than age 50 was associated significantly with mammography adherence (FET<0.05). Employment had a significant independent association with BSE; unemployed women were most likely to perform excessive BSE (OR=3.28, 95% CI: 1.05, 10.21, p<0.05).

Conclusions: The results of this study suggest a complex pattern of breast cancer screening practices among African American women at increased risk for hereditary breast cancer.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • African Americans*
  • Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis*
  • Breast Neoplasms / genetics
  • Breast Neoplasms / psychology
  • Family*
  • Female
  • Health Behavior
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Mammography / statistics & numerical data*
  • Middle Aged
  • Palpation / statistics & numerical data
  • Philadelphia