Invasive growth: a MET-driven genetic programme for cancer and stem cells

Nat Rev Cancer. 2006 Aug;6(8):637-45. doi: 10.1038/nrc1912.

Abstract

Metastasis follows the inappropriate activation of a genetic programme termed invasive growth, which is a physiological process that occurs during embryonic development and post-natal organ regeneration. Burgeoning evidence indicates that invasive growth is also executed by stem and progenitor cells, and is usurped by cancer stem cells. The MET proto-oncogene, which is expressed in both stem and cancer cells, is a key regulator of invasive growth. Recent findings indicate that the MET tyrosine-kinase receptor is a sensor of adverse microenvironmental conditions (such as hypoxia) and drives cell invasion and metastasis through the transcriptional activation of a set of genes that control blood coagulation.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Cell Hypoxia / physiology
  • Humans
  • Neoplasm Invasiveness / genetics*
  • Neoplasms / genetics*
  • Neoplasms / pathology*
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins / physiology*
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met
  • Receptors, Growth Factor / physiology*
  • Stem Cells / physiology*

Substances

  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins
  • Receptors, Growth Factor
  • MET protein, human
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met