A comparison of the cell phone driver and the drunk driver

Hum Factors. Summer 2006;48(2):381-91. doi: 10.1518/001872006777724471.

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this research was to determine the relative impairment associated with conversing on a cellular telephone while driving.

Background: Epidemiological evidence suggests that the relative risk of being in a traffic accident while using a cell phone is similar to the hazard associated with driving with a blood alcohol level at the legal limit. The purpose of this research was to provide a direct comparison of the driving performance of a cell phone driver and a drunk driver in a controlled laboratory setting.

Method: We used a high-fidelity driving simulator to compare the performance of cell phone drivers with drivers who were intoxicated from ethanol (i.e., blood alcohol concentration at 0.08% weight/volume).

Results: When drivers were conversing on either a handheld or hands-free cell phone, their braking reactions were delayed and they were involved in more traffic accidents than when they were not conversing on a cell phone. By contrast, when drivers were intoxicated from ethanol they exhibited a more aggressive driving style, following closer to the vehicle immediately in front of them and applying more force while braking.

Conclusion: When driving conditions and time on task were controlled for, the impairments associated with using a cell phone while driving can be as profound as those associated with driving while drunk.

Application: This research may help to provide guidance for regulation addressing driver distraction caused by cell phone conversations.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Alcoholic Intoxication*
  • Automobile Driving / standards*
  • Cell Phone*
  • Computer Simulation
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • United States