Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Comparative Study
, 127 (4), 1849-60

Effect of Dietary Protein Deprivation on Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I and -II, IGF Binding protein-2, and Serum Albumin Gene Expression in Rat

Affiliations
Comparative Study

Effect of Dietary Protein Deprivation on Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I and -II, IGF Binding protein-2, and Serum Albumin Gene Expression in Rat

D S Straus et al. Endocrinology.

Abstract

Circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and serum albumin are decreased under conditions of chronic dietary protein limitation. To investigate the biochemical mechanism(s) involved in the regulation of IGF-I and serum albumin synthesis by dietary protein, we studied the effects of protein limitation on IGF-I and serum albumin gene expression in young growing rats maintained on isocaloric diets containing 20%, 12%, 8%, or 4% protein. Animals maintained on the 12%, 8%, or 4% protein diets exhibited slight, moderate, or severe growth deficiency, respectively, and a decreased abundance of hepatic IGF-I messenger RNA (mRNA). The decrease in IGF-I mRNA was most pronounced for the largest [7.7 kilobase (kb)] species, which was decreased by 87% in animals maintained on the 4% protein diet compared with animals on the 20% protein diet. The 0.9 kb species of IGF-I mRNA exhibited a smaller (46%) reduction in abundance in animals maintained on the 4% protein diet. The differential regulation of the 7.7 kb IGF-I mRNA species compared with the shorter IGF-I mRNA species suggests that a sequence or sequences within the long 3'-untranslated region of this mRNA species may play a role in regulating its abundance under conditions of protein limitation. Serum albumin mRNA was also decreased (by 62%) in the animals maintained on the 4% protein diet. The level of serum albumin gene transcription was not decreased in animals on the low protein diets, suggesting that nutrition regulates albumin mRNA at a posttranscriptional step. There was considerable animal-to-animal variability in the level of IGF-I gene transcription within each dietary group. The mean level of IGF-I gene transcription was decreased by 46% in the animals on the 4% protein diet compared with animals on the 20% protein diet, although this decrease was not statistically significant because of the animal-to-animal variability in IGF-I gene transcription within the dietary groups. Additional studies of brain RNA from animals on the four diets indicated that brain IGF-II mRNA was decreased by 57% in animals on the 4% protein diet. It has been demonstrated recently that expression of the gene for IGF binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) is strongly induced in the liver of fasting animals. To investigate the possible regulation of the IGFBP-2 gene in the protein-limited animals, the abundance of liver and brain IGFBP-2 mRNA was analyzed in animals on the four diets.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 15 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback