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The Ancient Virus World and Evolution of Cells

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The Ancient Virus World and Evolution of Cells

Eugene V Koonin et al. Biol Direct.

Abstract

Background: Recent advances in genomics of viruses and cellular life forms have greatly stimulated interest in the origins and evolution of viruses and, for the first time, offer an opportunity for a data-driven exploration of the deepest roots of viruses. Here we briefly review the current views of virus evolution and propose a new, coherent scenario that appears to be best compatible with comparative-genomic data and is naturally linked to models of cellular evolution that, from independent considerations, seem to be the most parsimonious among the existing ones.

Results: Several genes coding for key proteins involved in viral replication and morphogenesis as well as the major capsid protein of icosahedral virions are shared by many groups of RNA and DNA viruses but are missing in cellular life forms. On the basis of this key observation and the data on extensive genetic exchange between diverse viruses, we propose the concept of the ancient virus world. The virus world is construed as a distinct contingent of viral genes that continuously retained its identity throughout the entire history of life. Under this concept, the principal lineages of viruses and related selfish agents emerged from the primordial pool of primitive genetic elements, the ancestors of both cellular and viral genes. Thus, notwithstanding the numerous gene exchanges and acquisitions attributed to later stages of evolution, most, if not all, modern viruses and other selfish agents are inferred to descend from elements that belonged to the primordial genetic pool. In this pool, RNA viruses would evolve first, followed by retroid elements, and DNA viruses. The Virus World concept is predicated on a model of early evolution whereby emergence of substantial genetic diversity antedates the advent of full-fledged cells, allowing for extensive gene mixing at this early stage of evolution. We outline a scenario of the origin of the main classes of viruses in conjunction with a specific model of precellular evolution under which the primordial gene pool dwelled in a network of inorganic compartments. Somewhat paradoxically, under this scenario, we surmise that selfish genetic elements ancestral to viruses evolved prior to typical cells, to become intracellular parasites once bacteria and archaea arrived at the scene. Selection against excessively aggressive parasites that would kill off the host ensembles of genetic elements would lead to early evolution of temperate virus-like agents and primitive defense mechanisms, possibly, based on the RNA interference principle. The emergence of the eukaryotic cell is construed as the second melting pot of virus evolution from which the major groups of eukaryotic viruses originated as a result of extensive recombination of genes from various bacteriophages, archaeal viruses, plasmids, and the evolving eukaryotic genomes. Again, this vision is predicated on a specific model of the emergence of eukaryotic cell under which archaeo-bacterial symbiosis was the starting point of eukaryogenesis, a scenario that appears to be best compatible with the data.

Conclusion: The existence of several genes that are central to virus replication and structure, are shared by a broad variety of viruses but are missing from cellular genomes (virus hallmark genes) suggests the model of an ancient virus world, a flow of virus-specific genes that went uninterrupted from the precellular stage of life's evolution to this day. This concept is tightly linked to two key conjectures on evolution of cells: existence of a complex, precellular, compartmentalized but extensively mixing and recombining pool of genes, and origin of the eukaryotic cell by archaeo-bacterial fusion. The virus world concept and these models of major transitions in the evolution of cells provide complementary pieces of an emerging coherent picture of life's history.

Reviewers: W. Ford Doolittle, J. Peter Gogarten, and Arcady Mushegian.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Viruses and other selfish elements: the replication strategies, genome size distribution, global ecology, and hallmark proteins. For each class of viruses and related elements, the approximate range of genome sizes is indicated (kb, kilobases). '+' denotes positive strand (same polarity as mRNA) and '-' denotes negative strand. Tr, transcription; T, translation; R, replication; E, encapsidation; A, archaea; B, bacteria; F, fungi; Mz, Metazoa; P, plants; UE, unicellular eukaryotes. For each class of viruses (elements), characteristic structures of hallmark proteins and characteristic electron-microscopic images of viruses are shown. RdRp, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase; JRC, jelly-roll capsid protein; RT, reverse transcriptase; RCRE, rolling-circle replication (initiating) endonuclease. The rightmost panel shows the host range, with the size of the respective image and acronym roughly proportionate to the abundance of the given virus class in the respective taxon.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Evolution of the virus world: origin of the main lineages from the primordial gene pool. Characteristic images of RNA and protein structures are shown for each postulated stage of evolution, and characteristic virion images are shown for the emerging classes of viruses. Thin arrows show the postulated movement of genetic pools between inorganic compartments. Block arrows show the origin of different classes of viruses at different stages of pre-cellular evolution.
Figure 3
Figure 3
The second melting pot of virus evolution: origin of eukaryotic viruses. Characteristic images of archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryotic viruses are shown.

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