Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Randomized Controlled Trial
, 87 (10), 1298-304

Effectiveness of Gait Training Using an Electromechanical Gait Trainer, With and Without Functional Electric Stimulation, in Subacute Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Affiliations
Randomized Controlled Trial

Effectiveness of Gait Training Using an Electromechanical Gait Trainer, With and Without Functional Electric Stimulation, in Subacute Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Raymond K Tong et al. Arch Phys Med Rehabil.

Abstract

Objective: To compare the therapeutic effects of conventional gait training (CGT), gait training using an electromechanical gait trainer (EGT), and gait training using an electromechanical gait trainer with functional electric stimulation (EGT-FES) in people with subacute stroke.

Design: Nonblinded randomized controlled trial.

Setting: Rehabilitation hospital for adults.

Participants: Fifty patients were recruited within 6 weeks after stroke onset; 46 of these completed the 4-week training period.

Intervention: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 gait intervention groups: CGT, EGT, or EGT-FES. The experimental intervention was a 20-minute session per day, 5 days a week (weekdays) for 4 weeks. In addition, all participants received their 40-minute sessions of regular physical therapy every weekday as part of their treatment by the hospital.

Main outcome measures: Five-meter walking speed test, Elderly Mobility Scale (EMS), Berg Balance Scale, Functional Ambulatory Category (FAC), Motricity Index leg subscale, FIM instrument score, and Barthel Index.

Results: The EGT and EGT-FES groups had statistically significantly more improvement than the CGT group in the 5-m walking speed test (CGT vs EGT, P=.011; CGT vs EGT-FES, P=.001), Motricity Index (CGT vs EGT-FES, P=.011), EMS (CGT vs EGT, P=.006; CGT vs EGT-FES, P=.009), and FAC (CGT vs EGT, P=.005; CGT vs EGT-FES, P=.002) after the 4 weeks of training. No statistically significant differences were found between the EGT and EGT-FES groups in all outcome measures.

Conclusions: In this sample with subacute stroke, participants who trained on the electromechanical gait trainer with body-weight support, with or without FES, had a faster gait, better mobility, and improvement in functional ambulation than participants who underwent conventional gait training. Future studies with assessor blinding and larger sample sizes are warranted.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 23 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

Feedback