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, 22 (10), 1093-9

A Retrospective Review of Bone Tunnel Enlargement After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Hamstring Tendons Fixed With a Metal Round Cannulated Interference Screw in the Femur

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A Retrospective Review of Bone Tunnel Enlargement After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Hamstring Tendons Fixed With a Metal Round Cannulated Interference Screw in the Femur

Masahiko Kobayashi et al. Arthroscopy.

Abstract

Purpose: To assess bone tunnel enlargement after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with the use of hamstring tendons fixed with a round cannulated interference (RCI) screw in the femur.

Methods: A consecutive series of 30 ACL reconstructions performed with hamstring tendons fixed with an RCI screw in the femur and with staples via Leeds-Keio ligament in the tibia was retrospectively reviewed. The clinical outcome was evaluated through the Lysholm score. Anterior instability was tested by Telos-SE (Telos Japan, Tokyo, Japan) measurement. The location and angle of each femoral and tibial tunnel were measured with the use of plain radiographs, and bone tunnel enlargement greater than 2 mm detected any time 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively was defined as positive. Each factor (location and angle of the tunnels, sex, affected side, age, Lysholm score, and Telos-SE measurement) was compared between enlarged and nonenlarged groups.

Results: Positive enlargement of the bone tunnel (>2.0 mm) was observed in 36.7% (11 of 30) on the femoral side and 33.3% (10 of 30) on the tibial side, and in 6 knees of both sides. Half of patients (15 of 30) had an enlarged tunnel on the femoral or the tibial side until 1 year postoperatively. In most cases, enlargement reached maximum at 6 months postoperatively. Female patients tended to have an enlarged tunnel, especially on the femoral side (P < .05). Tunnel enlargement was not correlated with location and angle of the tunnels. Moreover, no difference was found in Lysholm score and Telos-SE measurement between enlarged and nonenlarged groups, although the nonenlarged group tended to exhibit higher Lysholm score and lesser instability.

Conclusions: Bone tunnel enlargement of the femoral or tibial side was observed in half of patients (6 in both sides, 5 only in the femur, and 4 only in the tibia) after ACL reconstruction was performed with a hamstring tendon fixed with an RCI screw. Female patients had a greater chance for enlargement of the femoral tunnel than did males. This enlargement had no significant impact on patient activity and on anterior instability of the knee 1 year after surgery.

Level of evidence: Level IV, Therapeutic case series.

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