Initial experience with lung-MRI at 3.0T: Comparison with CT and clinical data in the evaluation of interstitial lung disease activity

Eur J Radiol. 2007 Feb;61(2):256-61. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2006.09.005. Epub 2006 Oct 10.

Abstract

Objectives: We evaluated the feasibility of highfield lung-MRI at 3.0T. A comparison with Computed Tomography (CT) and clinical data regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity in patients with diffuse lung disease was performed.

Material and methods: Prospective evaluation of 21 patients (15 males, 6 females, 43-80 y) with diffuse lung diseases who underwent clinical work-up inclusive laboratory tests, lung-function tests and transbronchial biopsy. After routine helical CT (additional 12 HRCT) a lung-MRI (3.0 Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) using a T2-weighted, cardiac and respiratory triggered Fast-Spinecho-Sequence (TE/TR=80/1500-2500 ms, 22 transverse slices, 7/2mm slice-thickness/-gap) was performed. A pneumologist classified the cases into two groups: A=temporary acute interstitial disease or chronic interstitial lung disease with acute episode or superimposed infection/B=burned out interstitial lung disease without activity. Two blinded CT-radiologists graded the cases in active/inactive disease on the basis of nine morphological criteria each. A third radiologist rated the MRI-cases as active/inactive, depending on the signal-intensities of lung tissues.

Results: The pneumologist classified 14 patients into group A and 7 patients into group B. Using CT, 6 cases were classified as active, 15 cases as inactive disease. With MRI 12 cases were classified as active and 9 cases as inactive. In the complete group of 21 patients MRI decisions and CT decisions respectively were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/4/15 respectively 0/8/13 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 72% (MRI) respectively 62% (CT). In the subgroup of 12 cases including HRCT, MRI respectively CT were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/1/9 respectively 0/5/7 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 75% (MRI) respectively 58% (CT).

Conclusion: Highfield MRI of the lung is feasible and performed slightly better compared to CT in the determination of activity in patients with interstitial lung diseases.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Evaluation Study

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Feasibility Studies
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Inflammation / diagnostic imaging
  • Inflammation / pathology
  • Inflammation / physiopathology*
  • Lung Diseases, Interstitial / diagnostic imaging
  • Lung Diseases, Interstitial / pathology
  • Lung Diseases, Interstitial / physiopathology*
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prospective Studies
  • Sensitivity and Specificity
  • Tomography, X-Ray Computed*