Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Controlled Clinical Trial
. 2006 Oct;14(10):1762-70.
doi: 10.1038/oby.2006.203.

The PPET Study: People and Pets Exercising Together

Affiliations
Free article
Controlled Clinical Trial

The PPET Study: People and Pets Exercising Together

Robert F Kushner et al. Obesity (Silver Spring). .
Free article

Abstract

Objective: Obesity is a significant public health problem that is affecting people and their pets. The human-companion animal bond and the role of pets in providing social support provides a rationale framework for studying the effectiveness of a combined people and pets (PP) exercising together (PPET) weight loss program.

Research methods and procedures: Thirty-six pairs of overweight or obese people with an obese pet (PP) and 56 overweight or obese people only (PO) participated in a 1-year prospective controlled weight loss study. In a group format, people received dietary and physical activity counseling, and dogs were fed a calorie-controlled prescription diet. Physical activity was recorded using the physical activity recall questionnaire.

Results: Completion rates at 1 year were 61% for the PP group and 58% for the PO group. Mean weight losses at 12 months using last observation carried forward were 4.7% (PP) and 5.2% (PO). Mean weight loss among the dogs was 15%. Time spent in physical activity increased in both groups to 3.9 (PP) and 3.5 (PO) h/wk. Two-thirds of total physical activity in the PP group was spent with the dogs.

Discussion: The PPET study is the first program to demonstrate the effectiveness of a combined PP weight loss program. This fresh approach to the dual obesity epidemic builds on the human-companion animal bond. Consideration of social support for weight loss of family members, friends, and coworkers should be extended to include pets.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 22 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

MeSH terms

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback