Myasthenia gravis: past, present, and future

J Clin Invest. 2006 Nov;116(11):2843-54. doi: 10.1172/JCI29894.

Abstract

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune syndrome caused by the failure of neuromuscular transmission, which results from the binding of autoantibodies to proteins involved in signaling at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). These proteins include the nicotinic AChR or, less frequently, a muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) involved in AChR clustering. Much is known about the mechanisms that maintain self tolerance and modulate anti-AChR Ab synthesis, AChR clustering, and AChR function as well as those that cause neuromuscular transmission failure upon Ab binding. This insight has led to the development of improved diagnostic methods and to the design of specific immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory treatments.

Publication types

  • Historical Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • History, 17th Century
  • History, 19th Century
  • History, 20th Century
  • History, 21st Century
  • Humans
  • Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use
  • Lymphocytes / immunology
  • Lymphocytes / metabolism
  • Myasthenia Gravis / diagnosis
  • Myasthenia Gravis / drug therapy*
  • Myasthenia Gravis / history
  • Myasthenia Gravis / immunology*
  • Neuromuscular Junction / immunology
  • Neuromuscular Junction / metabolism
  • Neuromuscular Junction / pathology
  • Receptors, Cholinergic / immunology
  • Receptors, Cholinergic / metabolism

Substances

  • Immunosuppressive Agents
  • Receptors, Cholinergic