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. 2006 Nov;34(9):606-9.
doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2006.02.006.

Poor Hospital Infection Control Practice in Hand Hygiene, Glove Utilization, and Usage of Tourniquets

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Poor Hospital Infection Control Practice in Hand Hygiene, Glove Utilization, and Usage of Tourniquets

Suzan Sacar et al. Am J Infect Control. .

Abstract

Background: Hospital-acquired infection often occurs because of lapses in accepted standards of practice on the part of health care personnel. The aim of this study is to attract attention on poor hospital infection control practice in venepuncture and use of tourniquets and emphasize the importance of hand hygiene.

Methods: Overall compliance with hygiene during usage of tourniquets and routine patient care before and after implementation of a hospital infection control measures was evaluated.

Results: According to the questionnaire, only 26.9% of respondents always washed their hands both before and after venepuncture. In the second step of the study, based on direct observation, hands were washed both before and after venepuncture on only 41 (45.1%) occasions. Failure to remove gloves after patient contact was observed on 23.1% occasions.

Conclusion: Our survey reveals poor infection control practice in hand hygiene, glove utilization, and usage of tourniquets and the implementation of infection control measures produced a moderate improvement in compliance with them.

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