Protein added to a sports drink improves fluid retention

Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2006 Aug;16(4):420-9. doi: 10.1123/ijsnem.16.4.420.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare fluid retention of carbohydrate plus protein, a carbohydrate-only, and water following 2.5% body weight (BW) loss. Thirteen subjects dehydrated to 2.5% of BW, then ingested a CHO (6%) plus protein drink (1.5%; CP), a 6% CHO drink, or water (WA) at a volume equal to BW loss during a 3-h recovery. Fluid retention was significantly greater for CP (88 +/- 4.7%) than CHO (75 +/- 14.6%), which was greater than WA (53 +/- 16.1%). Serum and urine osmolalities were greater for CP (284.7 +/- 5.0; 569.4 +/- 291.4 mOsm/kg) than CHO (282.6 +/- 5.2; 472.9 +/- 291.5 mOsm/kg) which were greater than WA (280.6 +/- 5.9, 303.7 +/- 251.5 mOsm/kg). Results indicate that fluid retention for CP was 15% greater than CHO and 40% greater than WA. Water ingestion led to a dilution of the serum and resulted in only 53% fluid retention.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Blood Chemical Analysis
  • Body Water / metabolism*
  • Cross-Over Studies
  • Dehydration / therapy*
  • Dietary Carbohydrates / administration & dosage
  • Dietary Carbohydrates / metabolism
  • Dietary Proteins / administration & dosage*
  • Dietary Proteins / metabolism
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Drinking*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Osmolar Concentration
  • Urine / chemistry

Substances

  • Dietary Carbohydrates
  • Dietary Proteins