Diet and Cancer

Acta Biomed. 2006 Aug;77(2):118-23.

Abstract

The aim of our study is to evaluate the relationship between diet and cancer development. It has been estimated that 30-40% of all kinds of cancer can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle and dietary measures. A low use of fibres, the intake of red meat and an imbalance of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fats may contribute to increase the risk of cancer. On the other hand, the assumption of lots of fruit and vegetables may lower the risk of cancer. Protective elements in a cancer-preventive diet include selenium, folic acid, vitamin B12, vitamin D, chlorophyll and antioxidants such as carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, cryptoxanthin). Ascorbic acid has limited benefits if taken orally, but it effective through intravenous injection. A supplementary use of oral digestive enzymes and probiotics is also an anticancer dietary measure. A diet drawn up according to the proposed guidelines could decrease the incidence of breast, colon-rectal, prostate and bronchogenic cancer.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Breast Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • Breast Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • Colorectal Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • Diet*
  • Diet, Vegetarian*
  • Dietary Fiber / administration & dosage
  • Dietary Supplements*
  • Feeding Behavior*
  • Female
  • Fruit
  • Glucose / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Lung Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • Male
  • Neoplasms / epidemiology
  • Neoplasms / prevention & control*
  • Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*
  • Probiotics / therapeutic use
  • Prostatic Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • Risk Factors
  • Soybean Proteins / administration & dosage
  • Vegetables

Substances

  • Dietary Fiber
  • Soybean Proteins
  • Glucose