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Review
, 61 (12), 14-20

Psychosis-related Disturbances. Psychosis, Agitation, and Disinhibition in Alzheimer's Disease: Definitions and Treatment Options

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  • PMID: 17184138
Review

Psychosis-related Disturbances. Psychosis, Agitation, and Disinhibition in Alzheimer's Disease: Definitions and Treatment Options

Jary M Lesser et al. Geriatrics.

Abstract

Approximately 50% to 80% of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have some type of behavioral or psychiatric condition (eg, agitation, psychosis, and/or disinhibition). Agitation is defined in the context of restlessness, irritability, and resistiveness. Psychosis is recognized as a disturbance in the perception of objective reality. Disinhibition means a chronic loss of social restraint. In the case of AD, disinhibition can present as aggression, hyperactivity, and socially intrusive behavior. Such conditions can be burdensome for physicians and caregivers to manage. Consequences may include caregiver burnout or illness, patient abuse, and even institutionalization for the patient. Management of behavioral disturbances is no longer primarily handled by psychiatrists, but is now entering the realm of family practice and primary care. This article provides evaluation methods and treatment options for the aforementioned behavioral disturbances.

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