Cognitive-behavioral interventions for IV insertion pain

AORN J. 2006 Dec;84(6):1031-48. doi: 10.1016/s0001-2092(06)64000-3.

Abstract

INSERTION OF AN IV CATHETER is a commonly performed and painful procedure. The use of cognitive-behavioral interventions (CBIs) may decrease pain by diverting the patient's attention to stimuli other than pain. THIS RANDOMIZED, CONTROLLED TRIAL examined the effect of three CBIs--music, kaleidoscope, and guided imagery--on IV insertion pain in 324 patients. NO STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT differences in IV insertion pain were found among the treatment and control groups or between choosing versus being assigned a CBI. Insertion attempts were more difficult in women, and insertion difficulty was correlated with pain intensity and pain distress. Pain intensity was related to insertion site and catheter gauge.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Choice Behavior
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy / methods*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Imagery, Psychotherapy
  • Infusions, Intravenous / adverse effects
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Music
  • Pain / etiology
  • Pain / psychology
  • Pain Management*
  • Sex Factors