The effect of a multi-component smoking cessation intervention in African American women residing in public housing

Res Nurs Health. 2007 Feb;30(1):45-60. doi: 10.1002/nur.20174.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a multi-component smoking cessation intervention in African American women residing in public housing. The intervention consisted of: (a) nurse led behavioral/empowerment counseling; (b) nicotine replacement therapy; and, (c) community health workers to enhance smoking self-efficacy, social support, and spiritual well-being. The results showed a 6-month continuous smoking abstinence of 27.5% and 5.7% in the intervention and comparison groups. Changes in social support and smoking self-efficacy over time predicted smoking abstinence, and self-efficacy mediated 6-month smoking abstinence outcomes. Spiritual well-being did not predict or mediate smoking abstinence outcomes. These findings support the use of a nurse/community health worker model to deliver culturally tailored behavioral interventions with marginalized communities.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • African Americans*
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Behavior Therapy
  • Community Health Nursing
  • Community Participation*
  • Female
  • Georgia
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Middle Aged
  • Nicotine / therapeutic use
  • Poverty
  • Self Efficacy
  • Smoking Cessation / methods*
  • Social Support*
  • Spirituality

Substances

  • Nicotine