Tissue/planar cell polarity in vertebrates: new insights and new questions

Development. 2007 Feb;134(4):647-58. doi: 10.1242/dev.02772.

Abstract

This review focuses on the tissue/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway and its role in generating spatial patterns in vertebrates. Current evidence suggests that PCP integrates both global and local signals to orient diverse structures with respect to the body axes. Interestingly, the system acts on both subcellular structures, such as hair bundles in auditory and vestibular sensory neurons, and multicellular structures, such as hair follicles. Recent work has shown that intriguing connections exist between the PCP-based orienting system and left-right asymmetry, as well as between the oriented cell movements required for neural tube closure and tubulogenesis. Studies in mice, frogs and zebrafish have revealed that similarities, as well as differences, exist between PCP in Drosophila and vertebrates.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Body Patterning / physiology*
  • Cell Polarity / physiology*
  • Drosophila
  • Organogenesis
  • Signal Transduction
  • Vertebrates