Kidney disease mortality--Michigan, 1989-2005

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Mar 16;56(10):225-7.

Abstract

Kidney disease was the ninth leading cause of death in Michigan in 2005 and in the United States in 2004. In 2004, the incidence rate for kidney failure (i.e., end-stage renal disease) was higher in Michigan than in the United States (365 versus 353 per 1 million population). A total of 3,695 Michigan residents started treatment (i.e., dialysis or transplant) for kidney failure in 2004; by the end of that year, 11,002 Michigan residents were receiving dialysis, and 614 had received a transplant. Many of these persons had a diagnosis of diabetes (40%) or hypertension (30%) as the primary cause of kidney failure. To examine recent trends in kidney disease mortality, the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) analyzed vital statistics data from the period 1989--2005. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that kidney disease mortality is a growing public health problem in Michigan and that blacks were more likely than whites to die from kidney disease. Continued disease-prevention and health-promotion activities, including targeted interventions among populations at greatest risk, are needed by MDCH and other organizations to reduce the burden of kidney disease in Michigan.

MeSH terms

  • African Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
  • European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Kidney Diseases / mortality*
  • Male
  • Michigan / epidemiology