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Comparative Study
, 42 (4), 383-94

Comparison of the Structures of Triacylglycerols From Native and Transgenic Medium-Chain Fatty Acid-Enriched Rape Seed Oil by Liquid Chromatography--Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometry (LC-APCI-ITMS)

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Comparative Study

Comparison of the Structures of Triacylglycerols From Native and Transgenic Medium-Chain Fatty Acid-Enriched Rape Seed Oil by Liquid Chromatography--Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometry (LC-APCI-ITMS)

Christopher Beermann et al. Lipids.

Abstract

The sn position of fatty acids in seed oil lipids affects physiological function in pharmaceutical and dietary applications. In this study the composition of acyl-chain substituents in the sn positions of glycerol backbones in triacylglycerols (TAG) have been compared. TAG from native and transgenic medium-chain fatty acid-enriched rape seed oil were analyzed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with online atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry. The transformation of summer rape with thioesterase and 3-ketoacyl-[ACP]-synthase genes of Cuphea lanceolata led to increased expression of 1.5% (w/w) caprylic acid (8:0), 6.7% (w/w) capric acid (10:0), 0.9% (w/w) lauric acid (12:0), and 0.2% (w/w) myristic acid (14:0). In contrast, linoleic (18:2n6) and alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n3) levels decreased compared with the original seed oil. The TAG sn position distribution of fatty acids was also modified. The original oil included eleven unique TAG species whereas the transgenic oil contained sixty. Twenty species were common to both oils. The transgenic oil included trioctadecenoyl-glycerol (18:1/18:1/18:1) and trioctadecatrienoyl-glycerol (18:3/18:3/18:3) whereas the native oil included only the latter. The transgenic TAG were dominated by combinations of caprylic, capric, lauric, myrisitic, palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), oleic (18:1n9), linoleic, arachidic (20:0), behenic (22:0), and lignoceric acids (24:0), which accounted for 52% of the total fat. In the original TAG palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids accounted for 50% of the total fat. Medium-chain triacylglycerols with capric and lauric acids combined with stearic, oleic, linoleic, alpha-linolenic, arachidic, and gondoic acids (20:1n9) accounted for 25% of the transgenic oil. The medium-chain fatty acids were mainly integrated into the sn-1/3 position combined with the essential linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids at the sn-2 position. Eight species contained caprylic, capric, and lauric acids in the sn-2 position. The appearance of new TAG in the transgenic oil illustrates the extensive effect of genetic modification on fat metabolism by transformed plants and offers interesting possibilities for improved enteral applications.

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Cited by 4 PubMed Central articles

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