Bedside Evaluation of Pressure-Volume Curves in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Curr Opin Crit Care. 2007 Jun;13(3):332-7. doi: 10.1097/MCC.0b013e32811e14f2.

Abstract

Purpose of review: To describe the physiologic and diagnostic utility of static pressure-volume curves of the respiratory system at the bedside in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Recent findings: The pressure-volume curve of the respiratory system is a useful tool for the measurement of respiratory system mechanics in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The pressure-volume curve has a sigmoid shape, with lower and upper points on the inspiratory limb and a point of maximum curvature on the expiratory limb. Visual and mathematical pressure-volume curve analysis may be useful for understanding individual lung mechanics and for selecting ventilator settings. Among the different techniques for acquiring pressure-volume curves at the bedside, the constant slow flow method is the simplest to perform, the most clinically reliable and has the fewest limitations.

Summary: Measurement of pressure-volume curves at the bedside in critically ill patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome should be considered a useful respiratory monitoring tool to assess physiologic lung status and to adjust ventilator settings, when appropriate, to minimize superimposed lung injury associated with mechanical ventilators.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Blood Pressure*
  • Blood Volume Determination*
  • Humans
  • Point-of-Care Systems*
  • Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult / blood
  • Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult / physiopathology*