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, 115 (5), A250-6

Perfluoroalkyl Acids: What Is the Evidence Telling Us?

Perfluoroalkyl Acids: What Is the Evidence Telling Us?

Kellyn S Betts. Environ Health Perspect.

Erratum in

  • Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Jul;115(7):A344

Figures

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Human exposure to PFAAs comes through myriad sources including contaminated drinking water and household products treated with stain or water repellants.
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PFAAs are ubiquitous in the environment, found on every continent in the world, in numerous mammal, fish, and bird species.
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Laboratory mice exposed prenatally to PFOS and PFOA develop more slowly and suffer a higher rate of neonatal mortality than nonexposed mice (left). Once exposed mice reach adulthood, however, they are more likely to become obese (above).
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Prenatal exposure to PFOS and PFOA can affect body weight and head circumference in human infants. Postnatal exposures, as through breastfeeding, have unknown effects.
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Studies of bottlenose dolphins with some of the highest levels of PFOS reported in wild animals indicate that the chemical may affect immune function.

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