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, 97 (5), 686-7

Left-handedness and Risk of Breast Cancer

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Left-handedness and Risk of Breast Cancer

L Fritschi et al. Br J Cancer.

Abstract

Left-handedness may be an indicator of intrauterine exposure to oestrogens, which may increase the risk of breast cancer. Women (n=1786) from a 1981 health survey in Busselton were followed up using death and cancer registries. Left-handers had higher risk of breast cancer than right-handers and the effect was greater for post-menopausal breast cancer (hazard ratio=2.59, 95% confidence interval 1.11-6.03).

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