Polysomnographic characteristics in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome

Pediatr Pulmonol. 2007 Oct;42(10):881-7. doi: 10.1002/ppul.20673.

Abstract

To evaluate the occurrence of sleep-disordered breathing and to clarify the characteristics of sleep among patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Overnight continuous EEG-polysomnographic studies were performed in 30 patients with PWS (16 males and 14 females; mean age, 7.4 +/- 4.1 years; age range, 1-19 years) unselected for sleep disturbance. The baseline arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) was 96.6 +/- 0.6%, with a nadir of 77.2 +/- 10.2%. The rapid eye movement (REM) latency was 67.4 +/- 30.0 min. The percent of total sleep time spent in sleep stages 1, 2, slow wave, and REM were 13.1 +/- 8.2%, 41.9 +/- 10.5%, 21.5 +/- 9.4%, and 21.1 +/- 5.7%, respectively. The respiratory disturbance index (RDI) was 5.8 +/- 3.7/hr and desaturation index (DI) was 8.1 +/- 7.3/hr, respectively. Age-adjusted BMI was associated with more severe hypoxemia during sleep (baseline SpO2, r = -0.53, P < 0.01; nadir SaO2, r = -0.65, P < 0.01; RDI, r = 0.37, P < 0.05; DI, r = 0.53, P < 0.01) and more sleep disruption (arousal index, r = 0.46, P < 0.01). There were no significant associations between gender or genotype pattern (deletion vs. uniparental disomy) and the results of polysomnography. Sleep hypoxemia and sleep disruption are more prevalent in patients with PWS than in normal children. Obesity in these patients is associated with more severe sleep-disordered breathing.

Publication types

  • Multicenter Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Body Mass Index
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Male
  • Polysomnography*
  • Prader-Willi Syndrome / complications
  • Prader-Willi Syndrome / physiopathology*
  • Prevalence
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Sleep Apnea Syndromes / epidemiology
  • Sleep Apnea Syndromes / etiology*