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, 32 (1), 48-55; discussion 56-7

Cell-assisted Lipotransfer for Cosmetic Breast Augmentation: Supportive Use of Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells

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Cell-assisted Lipotransfer for Cosmetic Breast Augmentation: Supportive Use of Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells

Kotaro Yoshimura et al. Aesthetic Plast Surg.

Abstract

Background: Lipoinjection is a promising treatment but has some problems, such as unpredictability and a low rate of graft survival due to partial necrosis.

Methods: To overcome the problems with lipoinjection, the authors developed a novel strategy known as cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL). In CAL, autologous adipose-derived stem (stromal) cells (ASCs) are used in combination with lipoinjection. A stromal vascular fraction (SVF) containing ASCs is freshly isolated from half of the aspirated fat and recombined with the other half. This process converts relatively ASC-poor aspirated fat to ASC-rich fat. This report presents the findings for 40 patients who underwent CAL for cosmetic breast augmentation.

Results: Final breast volume showed augmentation by 100 to 200 ml after a mean fat amount of 270 ml was injected. Postoperative atrophy of injected fat was minimal and did not change substantially after 2 months. Cyst formation or microcalcification was detected in four patients. Almost all the patients were satisfied with the soft and natural-appearing augmentation.

Conclusions: The preliminary results suggest that CAL is effective and safe for soft tissue augmentation and superior to conventional lipoinjection. Additional study is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of this technique further.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Scheme of cell-assisted lipotransfer. Relatively adipose-derived stem/stromal cell (ASC)-poor aspirated fat is converted to ASC-rich fat by supplementing ASCs isolated from the other half of the aspirated fat. The ASCs are attached to the aspirated fat, which is used as a scaffold in this strategy
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Schematic instruction of the injection method. (A) A small amount of fat tissue is injected as small aliquots or as a thin string with a long needle, using a syringe with a threaded plunger, while the needle is continuously withdrawn. (B) The needle is inserted from either one of two points on the areola margin or one of two points at the inframammary fold in variable directions and planes to achieve a diffuse distribution
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
A clinical view of injection. The injection needle is rigidly manipulated by an operator while an assistant rotates the plunger according to the operator’s instruction. A high-pressure injection can be performed using a disposable syringe with a threaded plunger. A 150-mm-long, 18-gauge needle is connected to the syringe with a connecting tube threaded at both ends
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Clinical views of a patient in group A (patient 1). Preoperative (left) and postoperative (right) views at 24 months. A 22-year-old woman underwent breast augmentation using cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL) (290 ml in each breast), with satisfactory results at 24 months. Her breast circumference increased by 5 cm, and her augmented breast mounds remained soft and natural appearing without injection scars or subcutaneous indurations
Fig. 5
Fig. 5
Radiologic views showing the chest of patient 1. (A) A preoperative computed tomography (CT) image in the horizontal plane of the nipples. (B) A horizontal image 12 months after surgery. Note that the adipose tissue is augmented both subcutaneously and under the mammary glands. (C) Mammograms at 12 months show no calcification or other abnormal signs
Fig. 6
Fig. 6
Clinical views of a patient in group C (patient 2). Preoperative (top) and postoperative (bottom) views at 12 months. A 32-year-old woman underwent breast augmentation with cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL) (280 ml in each breast). Her breast circumference difference increased from 9 cm (baseline) to 14.5 cm (at 12 months). The breast mounds are soft and natural appearing with no visible injection scars
Fig. 7
Fig. 7
Radiologic views showing the chest of patient 2. (A) A preoperative computed tomography (CT) image in the horizontal plane at the level of the nipples. (B and C) Horizontal images by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 12 months after surgery: (B) T1-image; (C) T2-image. The adipose tissue is augmented around and under the mammary glands. A small cyst (<10 mm) appears in the fatty layer under the right mammary gland. (D) Mammograms at 12 months show no abnormal signs such as calcifications
Fig. 8
Fig. 8
Clinical views of a patient in group C (patient 3). Preoperative (top) and postoperative (bottom) views at 24 months. A 30-year-old woman underwent breast augmentation with cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL) (310 ml in each breast). Her breasts were dramatically augmented with an increase in breast circumference difference by 8 cm at 24 months. The breast mounds were soft with no subcutaneous indurations. An original inframammary fold on the left breast is slightly visible, but injection scars are not visible
Fig. 9
Fig. 9
Radiologic views of patient 3. (A) A preoperative computed tomography (CT) image in the horizontal plane at the level of the nipples. Only a very thin fatty layer is observed around the mammary glands. (B) A horizontal magnetic resonance image (MRI) (T1 weighted) 24 months after surgery. Transplanted adipose tissues survived and formed thick layers around and under the mammary glands. (C) Mammograms 24 months after surgery show no abnormal signs

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