Unveiling the Roles of Autophagy in Innate and Adaptive Immunity

Nat Rev Immunol. 2007 Oct;7(10):767-77. doi: 10.1038/nri2161.

Abstract

Cells digest portions of their interiors in a process known as autophagy to recycle nutrients, remodel and dispose of unwanted cytoplasmic constituents. This ancient pathway, conserved from yeast to humans, is now emerging as a central player in the immunological control of bacterial, parasitic and viral infections. The process of autophagy may degrade intracellular pathogens, deliver endogenous antigens to MHC-class-II-loading compartments, direct viral nucleic acids to Toll-like receptors and regulate T-cell homeostasis. This Review describes the mechanisms of autophagy and highlights recent advances relevant to the role of autophagy in innate and adaptive immunity.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Autoimmunity / immunology
  • Autophagy*
  • Communicable Diseases / immunology
  • Homeostasis
  • Humans
  • Immunity, Cellular / immunology*
  • Immunity, Innate / immunology*
  • Inflammation / immunology
  • Parasitic Diseases / microbiology