Diabetes health disparities: a systematic review of health care interventions

Med Care Res Rev. 2007 Oct;64(5 Suppl):101S-56S. doi: 10.1177/1077558707305409.

Abstract

Racial and ethnic minorities bear a disproportionate burden of the diabetes epidemic; they have higher prevalence rates, worse diabetes control, and higher rates of complications. This article reviews the effectiveness of health care interventions at improving health outcomes and/or reducing diabetes health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities with diabetes. Forty-two studies met inclusion criteria. On average, these health care interventions improved the quality of care for racial/ethnic minorities, improved health outcomes (such as diabetes control and reduced diabetes complications), and possibly reduced health disparities in quality of care. There is evidence supporting the use of interventions that target patients (primarily through culturally tailored programs), providers (especially through one-on-one feedback and education), and health systems (particularly with nurse case managers and nurse clinicians). More research is needed in the areas of racial/ethnic minorities other than African Americans and Latinos, health disparity reductions, long-term diabetes-related outcomes, and the sustainability of health care interventions over time.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review
  • Systematic Review

MeSH terms

  • Diabetes Mellitus / epidemiology
  • Diabetes Mellitus / prevention & control
  • Diabetes Mellitus / therapy*
  • Ethnic Groups*
  • European Continental Ancestry Group*
  • Healthcare Disparities*
  • Humans
  • Minority Groups*
  • United States / epidemiology