Fatty Acid Synthase and the Lipogenic Phenotype in Cancer Pathogenesis

Nat Rev Cancer. 2007 Oct;7(10):763-77. doi: 10.1038/nrc2222.

Abstract

There is a renewed interest in the ultimate role of fatty acid synthase (FASN)--a key lipogenic enzyme catalysing the terminal steps in the de novo biogenesis of fatty acids--in cancer pathogenesis. Tumour-associated FASN, by conferring growth and survival advantages rather than functioning as an anabolic energy-storage pathway, appears to necessarily accompany the natural history of most human cancers. A recent identification of cross-talk between FASN and well-established cancer-controlling networks begins to delineate the oncogenic nature of FASN-driven lipogenesis. FASN, a nearly-universal druggable target in many human carcinomas and their precursor lesions, offers new therapeutic opportunities for metabolically treating and preventing cancer.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • AMP-Activated Protein Kinases
  • Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacology
  • Carcinoma in Situ / pathology
  • Cell Death / genetics
  • Fatty Acid Synthases / antagonists & inhibitors
  • Fatty Acid Synthases / metabolism*
  • Fatty Acids / biosynthesis
  • Genes, BRCA1
  • Glucose / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Lipogenesis / genetics*
  • Multienzyme Complexes / metabolism
  • Neoplasm Invasiveness
  • Neoplasm Metastasis
  • Neoplasms / drug therapy
  • Neoplasms / enzymology*
  • Neoplasms / genetics*
  • Neoplasms / pathology
  • Nuclear Proteins / genetics
  • Phenotype*
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / metabolism
  • Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 / metabolism
  • Transcription Factors / genetics

Substances

  • Antineoplastic Agents
  • Fatty Acids
  • Multienzyme Complexes
  • Nuclear Proteins
  • Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1
  • THRSP protein, human
  • Transcription Factors
  • Fatty Acid Synthases
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
  • AMP-Activated Protein Kinases
  • Glucose