Preferences for involvement in treatment decision-making generally and in hormone replacement and urinary incontinence treatment decision-making specifically

Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Nov;68(3):243-51. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2007.06.009. Epub 2007 Sep 27.

Abstract

Objective: To explore whether preferences for involvement in treatment decision-making change depending on the context and factors associated with preferences.

Methods: A national telephone survey of 1000 randomly selected Norwegian women aged 18 years or over using the Control Preferences Scale (CPS) to assess preferences.

Results: More women preferred an active role when asked about hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and urinary incontinence (UI) treatment decision-making specifically than when asked a question about preferences for involvement when generally making treatment decisions. Higher education and very good general health were significantly associated with preferring an active role in HRT and UI treatment decision-making. A negative attitude towards HRT was also significantly associated with preferring an active role when considering HRT. Women with higher educational levels were significantly more likely to choose an option from the CPS that indicated a preference for wanting more involvement in HRT decision-making compared to treatment decision-making generally.

Conclusions: Women's preferences for involvement in treatment decision-making change depending on the context as do factors associated with role preferences.

Practice implications: Health care professionals need to be aware that patients' preferences may change depending on the context of the treatment decision.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Chi-Square Distribution
  • Decision Making*
  • Female
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
  • Health Status
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy*
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Norway
  • Patient Participation*
  • Patient Satisfaction
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Urinary Incontinence / psychology*
  • Urinary Incontinence / therapy*