Local Self-Renewal Can Sustain CNS Microglia Maintenance and Function Throughout Adult Life

Nat Neurosci. 2007 Dec;10(12):1538-43. doi: 10.1038/nn2014. Epub 2007 Nov 18.

Abstract

Microgliosis is a common response to multiple types of damage in the CNS. However, the origin of the cells involved in this process is still controversial and the relative importance of local expansion versus recruitment of microglia progenitors from the bloodstream is unclear. Here, we investigated the origin of microglia using chimeric animals obtained by parabiosis. We found no evidence of microglia progenitor recruitment from the circulation in denervation or CNS neurodegenerative disease, suggesting that maintenance and local expansion of microglia are solely dependent on the self-renewal of CNS resident cells in these models.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Axotomy / methods
  • Bone Marrow Transplantation / methods
  • Calcium-Binding Proteins / metabolism
  • Cell Count
  • Central Nervous System / pathology*
  • Central Nervous System Diseases / complications
  • Central Nervous System Diseases / immunology
  • Central Nervous System Diseases / pathology*
  • Central Nervous System Diseases / surgery
  • Disease Models, Animal
  • Facial Nerve Diseases / pathology
  • Facial Nerve Diseases / physiopathology
  • Green Fluorescent Proteins / genetics
  • Humans
  • Mice
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Mice, Transgenic
  • Microfilament Proteins
  • Microglia / physiology*
  • Nerve Degeneration / etiology
  • Nerve Degeneration / immunology
  • Nerve Degeneration / pathology*
  • Nerve Degeneration / surgery
  • Parabiosis / methods
  • Radiation Chimera
  • Stem Cells / physiology
  • Superoxide Dismutase / genetics
  • Time Factors

Substances

  • Aif1 protein, mouse
  • Calcium-Binding Proteins
  • Microfilament Proteins
  • Green Fluorescent Proteins
  • SOD1 G93A protein
  • Superoxide Dismutase