Temporomandibular joint disorders

Am Fam Physician. 2007 Nov 15;76(10):1477-82.

Abstract

Temporomandibular joint disorders are common in adults; as many as one third of adults report having one or more symptoms, which include jaw or neck pain, headache, and clicking or grating within the joint. Most symptoms improve without treatment, but various noninvasive therapies may reduce pain for patients who have not experienced relief from self-care therapies. Physical therapy modalities (e.g., iontophoresis, phonophoresis), psychological therapies (e.g., cognitive behavior therapy), relaxation techniques, and complementary therapies (e.g., acupuncture, hypnosis) are all used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders; however, no therapies have been shown to be uniformly superior for the treatment of pain or oral dysfunction. Noninvasive therapies should be attempted before pursuing invasive, permanent, or semi-permanent treatments that have the potential to cause irreparable harm. Dental occlusion therapy (e.g., oral splinting) is a common treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, but a recent systematic review found insufficient evidence for or against its use. Some patients with intractable temporomandibular joint disorders develop chronic pain syndrome and may benefit from treatment, including antidepressants or cognitive behavior therapy.

Publication types

  • Review
  • Systematic Review

MeSH terms

  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents / administration & dosage
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy / methods
  • Diagnosis, Differential
  • Humans
  • Injections, Intra-Articular
  • Physical Therapy Modalities
  • Temporomandibular Joint Disorders* / diagnosis
  • Temporomandibular Joint Disorders* / etiology
  • Temporomandibular Joint Disorders* / therapy

Substances

  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents