Receipt of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation among heart attack survivors--United States, 2005

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008 Feb 1;57(4):89-94.

Abstract

Each year, approximately 865,000 persons in the United States have a myocardial infarction (i.e., heart attack). In 2007, direct and indirect costs of heart disease were estimated at approximately $277.1 billion. Cardiac rehabilitation, an essential component of recovery care after a heart attack, focuses on cardiovascular risk reduction, promoting healthy behaviors, reducing death and disability, and promoting an active lifestyle for heart attack survivors. Current guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation emphasize the importance of cardiac rehabilitation, which reduces morbidity and mortality, improves clinical outcomes, enhances psychological recovery, and decreases the risk for secondary cardiac events. To estimate the prevalence of receipt of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation among heart attack survivors in 21 states and the District of Columbia (DC), data from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were assessed. The results of that assessment indicated that 34.7% of BRFSS respondents who had experienced a heart attack participated in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for eligible patients after a heart attack is an essential component of care that should be incorporated into treatment plans. Increasing the number of persons who participate in cardiac rehabilitation services also can reduce health-care costs for recurrent events and reduce the burden on families and caregivers of patients with serious sequelae.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Ambulatory Care / statistics & numerical data*
  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Myocardial Infarction / rehabilitation*
  • Rehabilitation Centers / statistics & numerical data*
  • Survivors / statistics & numerical data
  • United States / epidemiology