Depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in a college sample

J Am Coll Health. Jan-Feb 2008;56(4):409-14. doi: 10.3200/JACH.56.44.409-414.

Abstract

Objective and participants: The authors examined (1) the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in a college sample and (2) the role of smoking self-efficacy (one's perceived ability to abstain from smoking) in explaining the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking.

Methods: Predominantly first-year college students at a large public university completed a self-report inventory indexing depressive symptoms, cigarette smoking, and smoking self-efficacy.

Results: Findings indicated that students high in depressive symptoms smoked significantly more cigarettes per day than did those with low depressive symptoms. Further, among current smokers, smoking self-efficacy explained the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking.

Conclusions: These findings add to accumulating evidence that depressive symptoms are a risk factor for increased cigarette smoking in college students. The authors discuss implications for university-based smoking cessation and prevention programs.

MeSH terms

  • Depression / epidemiology*
  • Female
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Self Efficacy
  • Smoking / epidemiology*
  • Smoking / psychology*
  • Students*
  • Universities*