Incidence of long-term disability following traumatic brain injury hospitalization, United States, 2003

J Head Trauma Rehabil. Mar-Apr 2008;23(2):123-31. doi: 10.1097/01.HTR.0000314531.30401.39.

Abstract

Objective: Develop and validate a predictive model of the incidence of long-term disability following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and obtain national estimates for the United States in 2003. DATA/METHODS: A logistic regression model was built, using a population-based sample of persons with TBI from the South Carolina Traumatic Brain Injury Follow-up Registry. The regression coefficients were applied to the 2003 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample data to estimate the incidence of long-term disability following traumatic brain injury hospitalization.

Results: Among 288,009 (95% CI, 287,974-288,043) hospitalized TBI survivors in the United States in 2003, an estimated 124,626 (95% CI, 123,706-125,546) had developed long-term disability.

Conclusion: TBI-related disability is a significant public health problem in the United States. The substantial incidence suggests the need for comprehensive rehabilitative care and services to maximize the potential of persons with TBI.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Brain Injuries / complications*
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Disabled Persons / statistics & numerical data*
  • Hospitalization
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Infant
  • Middle Aged
  • ROC Curve
  • United States / epidemiology