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. 2006 Jun 5;3(1):35-41.
doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-3-1-35.

Thermogenic Effect From Nutritionally Enriched Coffee Consumption

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Free PMC article

Thermogenic Effect From Nutritionally Enriched Coffee Consumption

Jay R Hoffman et al. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of nutritionally enriched JavaFittrade mark (JF) coffee (450 mg of caffeine, 1200 mg of garcinia cambogia, 360 mg of citrus aurantium extract, and 225 mcg of chromium polynicotinate) on resting oxygen uptake (VO2), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) in healthy and physically active individuals.

Method: Ten subjects (8 male, 2 female; 20.9 +/- 1.7 y; 178.1 +/- 10.4 cm; 71.8 +/- 12.1 kg) underwent two testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each session, subjects reported to the Human Performance Laboratory after at least 3-h post-absorptive state and were provided either 354 ml (1.5 cups) of freshly brewed JF or commercially available caffeinated coffee (P). Subjects then rested in a semi-recumbent position for three hours. VO2 and HR were determined every 5 min during the first 30 min and every 10 min during the next 150 min. BP was determined every 15 min during the first 30 min and every 30 min thereafter. Area under the curve (AUC) analysis was computed for VO2, whereas a session-average was calculated for RER, HR and BP.

Results: Initial analysis revealed no significant differences. However, seven of the ten subjects were considered responders to JF (had a higher AUC for VO2during JF than P). Statistical analysis showed the difference between JF and P (12%) to be significantly different in these responders. In addition, the average systolic BP was higher (p < 0.05) in JF (118 +/- 7 mmHg) than P (115 +/- 8 mmHg) in both the total sample and the subgroup of responders. No differences in average HR and average diastolic BP were observed between JF and P in both the total sample and the subgroup of responders.

Conclusion: It appears that consuming a nutritionally-enriched coffee beverage may increase resting energy expenditure in individuals that are sensitive to the caffeine and herbal coffee supplement. In addition, this supplement also appears to affect cardiovascular dynamics by augmenting systolic arterial blood pressure.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Area Under the Curve (AUC) Analysis for (A) 1-Hour and (B) 3-Hour Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption Following Coffee Consumption in Responders. * = JF significantly (p < 0.05) different than P. Data are reported mean ± SD.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Average Hourly Respiratory Exchange Ratio. * = JF significantly (p < 0.05) different than P. Data are reported mean ± SD.
Figure 3
Figure 3
A 3-Hour Average and Average Hourly Systolic Blood Pressure. 3B: 3-Hour Average and Average Hourly Diastolic Blood Pressure. BP = blood pressure. * = JF significantly (p < 0.05) different than P. Data are reported mean ± SD.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Average Standardized Scores (T Scores) of each Mood Trait during Profile of Mood States Administration. * = JF significantly (p < 0.05) different than P. Data are reported mean ± SD.

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