Cellular senescence and organismal aging

Mech Ageing Dev. Jul-Aug 2008;129(7-8):467-74. doi: 10.1016/j.mad.2008.04.001. Epub 2008 Apr 12.

Abstract

Cellular senescence, first observed and defined using in vitro cell culture studies, is an irreversible cell cycle arrest which can be triggered by a variety of factors. Emerging evidence suggests that cellular senescence acts as an in vivo tumor suppression mechanism by limiting aberrant proliferation. It has also been postulated that cellular senescence can occur independently of cancer and contribute to the physiological processes of normal organismal aging. Recent data have demonstrated the in vivo accumulation of senescent cells with advancing age. Some characteristics of senescent cells, such as the ability to modify their extracellular environment, could play a role in aging and age-related pathology. In this review, we examine current evidence that links cellular senescence and organismal aging.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Aging*
  • Cellular Senescence*
  • Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16 / metabolism
  • Disease / etiology
  • Humans
  • Telomere / metabolism

Substances

  • Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16