On the role of the ventral premotor cortex and anterior intraparietal area for predictive and reactive scaling of grip force

Brain Res. 2008 Sep 4;1228:73-80. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2008.06.027. Epub 2008 Jun 19.

Abstract

When lifting objects of different mass but identical visual appearance, we apply grip forces that match the expected mass of the object. Here we study the role of the primary motor cortex (M1), the ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and the anterior intraparietal area (AIP) for predictive and reactive scaling of grip forces. Participants performed a precision grip between the index finger and thumb of the right hand to lift two different masses of identical visual appearance in random order. Neuronavigated single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over (i) left M1, (ii) left PMv, (iii) left AIP and (iv) the vertex (for control) was applied at two time points of the grasping movement after an unexpected change in mass had occurred: (a) at the time of movement onset and (b) at the time of peak grasp aperture. TMS over the PMv, but not over the vertex, M1 or the AIP, interfered with the predictive scaling of grip forces according to the most recent lift when applied at the time of peak grasp aperture. In contrast, TMS over AIP, but not over the vertex, M1 or PMv, disrupted the reactive adjustment of grip force to the novel mass of the object at hand. The findings highlight the differential involvement of PMv in the predictive scaling of grip force and of AIP in the reactive online adjustment of grip force during object manipulation.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Analysis of Variance
  • Female
  • Fingers / physiology
  • Functional Laterality / physiology
  • Hand / physiology
  • Hand Strength / physiology*
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Motor Cortex / physiology*
  • Motor Skills / physiology
  • Parietal Lobe / physiology*
  • Psychomotor Performance / physiology*
  • Reaction Time / physiology
  • Task Performance and Analysis
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation / methods