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, 11 (4), 401-7

[Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children--An Analysis of the Clinical Symptoms and Selected Biochemical Parameters]

[Article in Polish]
Affiliations
  • PMID: 18605192

[Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children--An Analysis of the Clinical Symptoms and Selected Biochemical Parameters]

[Article in Polish]
Piotr Landowski et al. Med Wieku Rozwoj.

Abstract

Aim of the study: an analysis of clinical symptoms and laboratory tests in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Patients and methods: eighty-nine children with IBD (58 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 31 with Crohn's disease (CD) diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms, endoscopic and histopathological examination, were qualified into the studied group. Disease activity was evaluated by using Truelowe-Witts scale for UC and PCDA9 scale for CD cases. Forty-two children without acute or chronic inflammatory diseases constituted the control group.

Results: the frequency of such clinical symptoms as: diarrhea, fever, weight loss, abdominal pain, weakness, constipations, anemia, joints pain, vomits, and jaundice was comparable in children with UC and CD while intestinal bleeding was significantly more frequently observed in patients with UC than with CD (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in BMI between patients with UC and CD. Cole's index was significantly higher in children with UC than with CD (P<0.05). Hemoglobin level and serum iron level were statistically significantly lower in patients with CD than in the control group (P<0.05). Mean leukocyte count in children with CD was significantly higher than in the control group (P<0.05). Neutrophils percentage in patients with UC and CD was significantly higher than in the control group (P<0.05). Platelet count was significantly higher in all children with IBD than in the control group (P<0.05). Mean serum CRP level was significantly higher only in children with CD while ESR was significantly higher in both groups of IBD patients. Mean serum gamma-globulin level was statistically significantly higher in children with UC and with CD but no significant differences were observed in serum IgA, IgG, and IgM levels among the analyzed groups. Serum GT level was higher in children with CD than in the control group while serum ALT and AST level did not differ significantly among the analyzed groups of patients.

Conclusions: 1. Serum C-reactive protein level is one of the most valuable markers for monitoring the course of IBD, especially CD, in children. 2. In patients with IBD systematic monitoring of liver function parameters (especially parameters of cholestasis) is necessary as severe hepatic complications may occur. 3. Further search for new sensitive and specific markers monitoring the course of inflammatory bowel diseases is needed.

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