The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder in a frontline service setting

Cogn Behav Ther. 2008;37(3):192-8. doi: 10.1080/16506070802190262.

Abstract

The goal of the current study was to test the generalizability of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a frontline service setting. Twenty-nine patients who presented to treatment clinics with problematic worry were provided CBT for GAD. Among the intent-to-treat sample, there were no significant changes in worry or depression from pre- to posttreatment. Treatment completers showed significant pre- to posttreatment reductions on measures of worry and depression. The magnitude of change was smaller than has been reported in randomized control trials (RCTs). Although the frontline service setting differed from RCT settings in multiple ways, treatment completers nonetheless achieved moderate to large decreases in self-reported worry and depression.

Publication types

  • Controlled Clinical Trial
  • Multicenter Study

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Ambulatory Care Facilities
  • Anxiety Disorders / diagnosis
  • Anxiety Disorders / psychology
  • Anxiety Disorders / therapy*
  • Benchmarking*
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy / education
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy / standards*
  • Depressive Disorder / diagnosis
  • Depressive Disorder / psychology
  • Depressive Disorder / therapy
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Inservice Training
  • Male
  • Personality Inventory / statistics & numerical data
  • Psychometrics
  • Treatment Outcome