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, 4 (3), 169-90

Radiation Hormesis: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

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Radiation Hormesis: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

T D Luckey. Dose Response.

Abstract

Three aspects of hormesis with low doses of ionizing radiation are presented: the good, the bad, and the ugly. The good is acceptance by France, Japan, and China of the thousands of studies showing stimulation and/or benefit, with no harm, from low dose irradiation. This includes thousands of people who live in good health with high background radiation. The bad is the nonacceptance of radiation hormesis by the U. S. and most other governments; their linear no threshold (LNT) concept promulgates fear of all radiation and produces laws which have no basis in mammalian physiology. The LNT concept leads to poor health, unreasonable medicine and oppressed industries. The ugly is decades of deception by medical and radiation committees which refuse to consider valid evidence of radiation hormesis in cancer, other diseases, and health. Specific examples are provided for the good, the bad, and the ugly in radiation hormesis.

Keywords: BEIR VI; cancer; deception; health; radon; therapy.

Figures

FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1
Dr. Sadao Hattori, retired Senior Vice President and Director of Research, Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industries (CRIEPI), Tokyo. (With permission of Dr. Hattori)
FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2
Dr. Kiyohiko Sakamoto, retired Professor, Medical School, Tohoku University, Sendai. (With permission of Dr. Sakamoto)
FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3
Home radon decreases lung cancer deaths. Data of B. Cohen (1995) from 200,000 radon samples from 1,600 counties in which live 90% of the United States population. One standard deviation is displayed. The dotted line suggests the optimum radon level is about 8 pCi/l.
FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4
Lung cancer deaths from radon in miners. Pooled analysis of the relative risks of lung cancer deaths, with 95% confidence limits, from 11 underground miner studies (adapted from p. 89, BEIR VI, 1999).
FIGURE 5
FIGURE 5
Lung cancer deaths from radon in homes. Eight case control studies of relative risks for lung cancer death rates of people in homes (adapted from p. 377, BEIR VI, 1999). Units for the abscissa are pCi/l. One standard deviation is indicated.
FIGURE 6
FIGURE 6
Cumulative cancer death rates in Japanese bomb victims. Numbers on the right list thousands of persons for each dose (Shimizu et al., 1989).
FIGURE 7
FIGURE 7
Breast cancer deaths in women treated for tuberculosis. Breast cancer death rates of Canadian women repeatedly X-rayed by fluoroscopy to monitor lung-collapse therapy for tuberculosis (Miller et al., 1989). One standard deviation is displayed.

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