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Review
, 14 (29), 4607-15

Chronic Liver Disease in Aboriginal North Americans

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Review

Chronic Liver Disease in Aboriginal North Americans

John D Scott et al. World J Gastroenterol.

Abstract

A structured literature review was performed to detail the frequency and etiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in Aboriginal North Americans. CLD affects Aboriginal North Americans disproportionately and is now one of the most common causes of death. Alcoholic liver disease is the leading etiology of CLD, but viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis C, is an important and growing cause of CLD. High rates of autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are reported in regions of coastal British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. Non-alcoholic liver disease is a common, but understudied, cause of CLD. Future research should monitor the incidence and etiology of CLD and should be geographically inclusive. In addition, more research is needed on the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in this population.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Frequency of specific etiologies for chronic liver disease among AI/AN. Phoenix Indian Medical Center (PIMC), Phoenix, Arizona, 2000-2002, n = 1496. Riverside San Bernardino County Indian Health, Inc (RSBCIHI), Riverside, California, 2002-2003, n = 344. Alaska Native Medical Center (ANMC), Anchorage, AK, 2003-2004, n = 1903. Data adapted from[67] with permission. Not all categories are mutually exclusive in ANMC.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Common causes of chronic liver disease in Aboriginal North Americans.

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