Prevalence of colon polyps detected by colonoscopy screening in asymptomatic black and white patients

JAMA. 2008 Sep 24;300(12):1417-22. doi: 10.1001/jama.300.12.1417.

Abstract

Context: Compared with white individuals, black men and women have a higher incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer and may develop cancer at a younger age. Colorectal cancer screening might be less effective in black individuals, if there are racial differences in the age-adjusted prevalence and location of cancer precursor lesions.

Objectives: To determine and compare the prevalence rates and location of polyps sized more than 9 mm in diameter in asymptomatic black and white individuals who received colonoscopy screening.

Design, setting, and patients: Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from 67 adult gastrointestinal practice sites in the United States using a computerized endoscopic report generator between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2005. Data were transmitted to a central data repository, where all asymptomatic white (n = 80 061) and black (n = 5464) patients who had received screening colonoscopy were identified.

Main outcome measures: Prevalence and location of polyps sized more than 9 mm, adjusted for age, sex, and family history of colorectal cancer in a multivariate analysis.

Results: Both black men and women had a higher prevalence of polyps sized more than 9 mm in diameter compared with white men and women (422 [7.7%] vs 4964 [6.2%]; P < .001). Compared with white patients, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for black men was 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.34) and the adjusted OR for black women was 1.62 (95% CI, 1.39-1.89). Black and white patients had a similar risk of proximal polyps sized more than 9 mm (OR, 1.13;95% CI, 0.93-1.38). However, in a subanalysis of patients older than 60 years, proximal polyps sized more than 9 mm were more likely prevalent in black men (P = .03) and women (P < .001) compared with white men and women.

Conclusion: Compared with white individuals, black men and women undergoing screening colonoscopy have a higher risk of polyps sized more than 9 mm, and black individuals older than 60 years are more likely to have proximal polyps sized more than 9 mm.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data*
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Colonic Polyps / diagnosis*
  • Colonic Polyps / epidemiology*
  • Colonoscopy*
  • Colorectal Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Mass Screening
  • Middle Aged
  • Prevalence
  • Risk
  • United States / epidemiology