BAR the door: cancer suppression by amphiphysin-like genes

Biochim Biophys Acta. 2009 Jan;1795(1):25-36. doi: 10.1016/j.bbcan.2008.09.001. Epub 2008 Sep 18.

Abstract

The evolutionarily conserved amphiphysin-like genes Bin1 and Bin3 function in membrane and actin dynamics, cell polarity, and stress signaling. Recent genetic studies in mice discriminate non-essential roles in endocytic processes commonly ascribed to amphiphysins from essential roles in cancer suppression. Bin1 acts in default pathways of apoptosis and senescence that are triggered by the Myc and Raf oncogenes in primary cells, and Bin1 gene products display a 'moonlighting function' in the nucleus where a variety of other 'endocytic' proteins are also found. Together, genetic investigations in yeast, flies, and mice suggest that amphiphysin-like adapter proteins may suppress cancer by helping integrate cell polarity signals generated by actin and vesicle dynamics with central regulators of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and immune surveillance.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing / genetics
  • Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing / physiology*
  • Animals
  • Cell Polarity / genetics
  • Genes, Tumor Suppressor / physiology*
  • Humans
  • Microfilament Proteins / genetics
  • Microfilament Proteins / physiology
  • Models, Biological
  • Neoplasms / genetics*
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins / genetics
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins / physiology*
  • Nuclear Proteins / genetics
  • Nuclear Proteins / physiology
  • Stress, Physiological / genetics
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins / genetics
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins / physiology

Substances

  • Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing
  • BIN1 protein, human
  • BIN3 protein, human
  • Microfilament Proteins
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins
  • Nuclear Proteins
  • Tumor Suppressor Proteins
  • amphiphysin