Smoking-attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Productivity losses--United States, 2000-2004

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008 Nov 14;57(45):1226-8.

Abstract

Cigarette smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke are associated with premature death from chronic diseases, economic losses to society, and a substantial burden on the United States health-care system. Smoking is the primary causal factor for at least 30% of all cancer deaths, for nearly 80% of deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and for early cardiovascular disease and deaths. In 2005, to assess the economic and public health burden from smoking, CDC published results of an analysis of smoking-attributable mortality (SAM), years of potential life lost (YPLL), and productivity losses in the United States from smoking during 1997-2001. The analysis was based on data from CDC's Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs (SAMMEC) system, which estimates SAM, YPLL, and productivity losses based on data from the National Health Interview Survey and death certificate data from the National Center for Health Statistics. This report presents an update of that analysis for 2000-2004, the most recent years for which source data are available. The updated analysis indicated that, during 2000-2004, cigarette smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke resulted in at least 443,000 premature deaths, approximately 5.1 million YPLL, and $96.8 billion in productivity losses annually in the United States. Comprehensive, national tobacco-control recommendations have been provided to the public health community with the goal of reducing smoking so substantially that it is no longer a significant public health problem in the United States.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / mortality
  • Cause of Death
  • Cost of Illness
  • Efficiency
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Life Tables
  • Lung Neoplasms / mortality
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Morbidity
  • Pregnancy
  • Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive / mortality
  • Smoking / economics
  • Smoking / mortality*
  • Tobacco Smoke Pollution / adverse effects*
  • Tobacco Smoke Pollution / economics
  • United States / epidemiology

Substances

  • Tobacco Smoke Pollution