Pyroptosis: Host Cell Death and Inflammation

Nat Rev Microbiol. 2009 Feb;7(2):99-109. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro2070.

Abstract

Eukaryotic cells can initiate several distinct programmes of self-destruction, and the nature of the cell death process (non-inflammatory or proinflammatory) instructs responses of neighbouring cells, which in turn dictates important systemic physiological outcomes. Pyroptosis, or caspase 1-dependent cell death, is inherently inflammatory, is triggered by various pathological stimuli, such as stroke, heart attack or cancer, and is crucial for controlling microbial infections. Pathogens have evolved mechanisms to inhibit pyroptosis, enhancing their ability to persist and cause disease. Ultimately, there is a competition between host and pathogen to regulate pyroptosis, and the outcome dictates life or death of the host.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Apoptosis / physiology*
  • Caspase 1 / metabolism*
  • Fever
  • Humans
  • Inflammation / metabolism*
  • Mice

Substances

  • Caspase 1