Profits and plagiarism: the case of medical ghostwriting

Bioethics. 2010 Jul;24(6):267-72. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8519.2008.00705.x. Epub 2009 Feb 16.

Abstract

This paper focuses on medical ghostwriting in the United States. I argue that medical ghostwriting often involves plagiarism and, in those cases, can be treated as an act of research misconduct by both the federal government and research institutions. I also propose several anti-ghostwriting measures, including: 1) journals should implement guarantor policies so that researchers may be better held accountable for their work; 2) research institutions and the federal government should explicitly prohibit medical ghostwriting and outline appropriate penalties; and 3) a publicly available database should be created to record researchers' ethics violations.

MeSH terms

  • Academies and Institutes / ethics
  • Authorship*
  • Conflict of Interest
  • Contract Services / ethics
  • Databases, Factual
  • Disclosure / ethics
  • Drug Industry / ethics
  • Editorial Policies
  • Federal Government
  • Government Regulation
  • Guidelines as Topic
  • Humans
  • Periodicals as Topic / ethics*
  • Periodicals as Topic / statistics & numerical data
  • Plagiarism*
  • Publishing / ethics
  • Publishing / statistics & numerical data
  • Scientific Misconduct / ethics*
  • Scientific Misconduct / statistics & numerical data
  • United States
  • Universities / ethics
  • Writing*