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. 2009 Aug 31;134(1-2):96-103.
doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2009.02.010. Epub 2009 Feb 20.

Campylobacter Genotypes From Food Animals, Environmental Sources and Clinical Disease in Scotland 2005/6

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Campylobacter Genotypes From Food Animals, Environmental Sources and Clinical Disease in Scotland 2005/6

Samuel K Sheppard et al. Int J Food Microbiol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

A nationwide multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) survey was implemented to analyze patterns of host association among Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolates from clinical disease in Scotland (July 2005-September 2006), food animals (chickens, cattle, sheep, pigs and turkey), non-food animals (wild birds) and the environment. Sequence types (STs) were determined for 5247 clinical isolates and 999 from potential disease sources (augmented with 2420 published STs). Certain STs were over represented among particular sample sets/host groups. These host-associated STs were identified for all sample groups in both Campylobacter species and host associated clonal complexes (groups of related STs) were characterized for C. jejuni. Some genealogical lineages were present in both human disease and food animal samples. This provided evidence for the relative importance of different infection routes/food animal sources in human disease. These results show robust associations of particular genotypes with potential infection sources supporting the contention that contaminated poultry is a major source of human disease.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1. Confirmed clinical cases of human campylobacteriosis in each NHS health board region in Scotland (2005/6).
The Argyll and Clyde region has since been subsumed into the Greater Glasgow health board. Infection caused by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are indicated by the light and dark grey regions on the graph.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2. Sequence types (ST) among Campylobacter jejuni isolates from food animals: chickens (A), cattle (B), sheep (C), the environment (D), and wild birds (E).
STs are ordered by clonal complex and frequencies are represented by vertical bars. The major clonal complexes are indicated.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3. Sequence types (ST) among Campylobacter coli isolates from food animals: chickens (A), cattle (B), sheep (C), pigs (D), and turkeys (E).
STs are ordered by clonal complex and frequencies are represented by vertical bars. The 828 and 1150 clonal complexes are indicated.
Fig. 4
Fig. 4. Clonal complexes (CCs) among Campylobacter isolates from food animal and none food sources.
C. jejuni STs are from chickens (A), cattle (B), sheep (C), the environment (D), and wild birds (E) and C. coli STs are from chickens (A), cattle (B), sheep (C), pigs (D) and turkeys (E). The proportion of clonal complexes (shaded areas) among isolates from each host population is indicated. Coloured shading highlights clonal complexes that are predominantly associated with a particular host. 177 and 682 clonal complexes are common among isolates from starling faecal samples not included in this study.
Fig. 5
Fig. 5. Clonal frame genealogy of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli genotypes isolated from clinical cases of campylobacteriosis in Scotland (2005/6).
Fig. 6
Fig. 6. Phylogenetic relationships among disease-causing C. jejuni (A) and C. coli (B) Sequence Types (STs) in 2005/6.
The genealogy was constructed using ClonalFrame software. ST-based clonal complexes responsible for 1% or more of human disease (constituting 97% of the total) are indicated. The diameter of each pie chart is proportional to the number of disease cases caused and the area of shaded segments indicates frequency that each clonal complex occurs in comparison to scaled data sets for C. jejuni (Bovine=586, Poultry=1288, Wild bird=170, Environmental=91, Ovine=249) and C. coli (Bovine=86, Poultry=459, Ovine=57, Porcine=322, Turkey=111). The scale bar represents the genetic distance. * indicates clonal complexes that are not well supported by the ClonalFrame genealogy.

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